Tag Archives: library

I’m looking up bad words in the library

Phil: Progress on our next book hasn’t been rapid recently. Both Candice and I are living very busy lives at the moment and things are getting in the way of writing. We’ve bashed some idea around via e-mail, but it’s not the same as meeting up in person, and it certainly doesn’t get the word count up.

Easter meant that the people in my office were away, leaving me in peace to catch up on some work, and with a day off that I decided would be given over to novel-writing.

Since I work from home, a trip to the local library would be a good break too. iPod on, laptop out, words written.

It’s odd working in the library. I keep looking around and remembering it’s where I learnt to swim.

You see, Leamington Spa is over-supplied with rather useless old buildings that eat council tax but can’t actually be used for anything of benefit. Worse, if you try to do anything with them, you face the wrath of those desperate to pickle the town in aspic in an imaginery verison of 1910.

Still, the conversion of swimming pool to library has worked well. Centrally located, it has enough space for books and a gallery full of reference works and tables for students or itnierant writers. These are popular. So popular that people go out to lunch or shopping leaving all their worldly goods in their space so no-one else grabs the seat. If you want a free laptop, just hang around until one of the students has wandered off…

Anyway, it worked. Almost 5000 words down. A great new plot strand developed and a few changes to our plans made once the characters started to do their thing on the page.

Thanks to the free WiFi, I was able to work out what the sound of someone being sick looks like in letters. I also checked out the plots of several plays that form part of our plot. OK, I did slope off for lunch (taking my stuff with me) and a refreshing half of rhubarb cider to lubricate the creative juices, but then it’s my day off…

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Phil, Writing

No libraries = No Terry Pratchett

pterrylibrary

Phil: This week’s blog post was set to be something whimsical and lightweight. Then I sat in my hotel room on Saturday night after a couple of bottles of pomegranate and strawberry cider washing down a rather nice curry, and flipped on the telly.

Terry Pratchett – Back in Black tells the author’s life story. Paul Kaye plays pTerry (as his fans call him) and along the way we meet both famous and non-famous readers. We see how the literary establishment hated his books complete with a cringeworthy clip from a review show that those taking part will probably wish to forget, and later decided he was A. Good. Thing. Along with another clip of more literary people saying this.

I’ve tried but failed to read Pratchett. I ought to love it but I can’t find a way in. It doesn’t matter, the documentary is brilliant, affecting and a superb celebration of the man.

What struck me was that before he wrote, he read. Everything. Well, everything in his local library starting with fantasy and then history, “Blokes in helmets bashing each other” as he described it. Reading planted all the seeds for the character in his stories.

This week, I read in my local paper that our council is making more cuts. Headlines are those for old people or children but tucked away are libraries – again.

I’ve said before how my local library was essential for my development. I’m not going to compare myself with Pratchett but to lift a line from the documentary, I’m a human. He is a human. My poo stinks. His poo stinks. I loved my library. He loved his library. He is a writer. I want to be a writer.

Does it matter if we deny kids the chance to wallow in reading? Probably not. After all, do we need people with imagination?

Sorry, I’m ranting. Go and watch the programme on iPlayer while you have a the chance. Just keep some tissues handy…

Leave a comment

Filed under Phil, Writing

History repeats itself

librarybooks

Phil: Life is funny isn’t it?

Many years ago, I used to be an obsessive visitor to my little local library. I’d head straight into the children’s section and delight in picking interesting looking books from the shelves. My default choice would be stories of the Famous Five by Enid Blyton. I read each book more than once. The Kirrin Island one never seemed popular with other borrowers so I know it cam home with me many times in lieu of anything better.

Decades later, I’m back.

This time the reading is rather more adult. Candice introduced me to David Baldacci and I find that there are several of his books on the shelf. I know I’m going to work my way through all these.

But I can. That’s what’s so wonderful about a library. And that hasn’t changed in years.

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, Phil

Writing progress – BOOM!

Library CakePhil: There I am, sitting in a deck chair besides Solihull’s latest tourist attraction – a beach – perusing a magazine about fixing rusty cars, when I’m tapped on the shoulder.

“Don’t you want any cake then?”

Shockingly, I’d been so excited about the mock seaside, I’d not spotted that Candice had lined up pots of tea and a choice of cake in the cafe behind me.

Not to worry, once we’d polished off the refreshments (sparkly cake – excellent!) and I’d established that she’d not brough me any souvenirs back from the previous days trip to Cadbury World (Boo), we got on to discussing the book.

Writers – here’s a handy hint. If you’ve lost your mojo, give some copies of your book away. Once people start talking about it, you’ll be back at the keyboard toot sweet.

It’s certainly working for us. My friend is giddy with excitement about the book now she’s passing copies around her friends and we can see loads of people have downloaded copies. OK, we’re not making money but then we never expected to become as rich as Rowling. We just want people to read and enjoy the story.

And the reviews say they are. It’s a wonderful feeling.

All of which got us sat around a library table with laptops out. At first we discussed how the overall story arc should go in the second book. We’ve worked this out already but this time there was detail. There has to be when the words are to hit the page.

Not only this, we filled in some blanks for the books to follow this as well. It was very exciting to be back discussing plots and ideas.

After this, there was writing. Maybe the sugar rush from the cake was powering us, but after an hour or so, we swapped computers and read the 1000 or so words we’d each written. New words but ones that fitted like jigsaw pieces into the story we are telling.

So, giving away a few copies of our book isn’t such a daft idea after all.

Leave a comment

Filed under Phil, Writing

Setting the book free

loosebook
Phil: Right – Book 1 is finished. Done. Dusted. We’re just working on the marketing and have sold a few copies.

Our signing session before Christmas saw us leave with a few printed copies. Some of these have been given away as presents but I decided that I was going to do something different with one of mine.

My local station has a “library” in the waiting room on platform 3. In the corner of this marvellously restored Art Deco room there is a small bookcase. On the shelves are books donated by travellers. If you need some reading for your journey, you can pick it up from here for free.

In the collection is a copy of Kate vs The Dirtboffins.

I wonder what will happen to it. Presumably it will be picked up by someone who has never heard of us.

I hope they like it.

3 Comments

Filed under Phil, Publishing, Writing

Getting some work done

8th AprilPhil: After last weeks blog post, when I was being admonished for not having written much book recently, Candice and I met up for lunchtime cake. I was a little worried that she was going to go all Clarkson on my ass, but no.

Instead, we sat down and talked about some of the plot points that needed to be resolved. Thanks to the excellent cake in front of us, I didn’t get shouted at at all.

My excuse was simple – I was busy. Now normally this would get the grumpy, “Well, I’m juggling the management of a baby, husband, cat and I’m training for a half marathon” response, but this time I used the cunning trick of finding similarities in the way we work to defuse this.

My work isn’t governed by time taken as much as projects knocked off. On a whiteboard beside my computer is a list of deadlines. Below each of these is a list of projects to be completed by then. The thing is, we both work better with deadlines, so I knew I’d receive a sympathetic hearing.

My next deadline was April 8th and I’d worked out that if I pulled my finger out that week, I could clear the jobs nearly two weeks early. That’s a goal worth working for. There was a little time spare for the gym or a cakey lunch each day but basically, I was on a mission.

And I did it.

Which meant that last Saturday morning I was waiting outside the local library with my laptop, drinks, Smarties and thanks to a farmers market, a small piece of chocolate brownie. A few hours later, 3,500 words were added to the story and the results e-mailed over to La Nolan for her consideration.

Best of all, while writing, I’d worked out the final shape of a plot feature we’d talked about over cake. It’s one of our set piece funny moments and this one is shaping up to be very funny indeed.

Leave a comment

Filed under Phil, Writing

Wanted: Home for a writer

Kleines CaféPhil: Working from home, I prefer to write fiction somewhere that isn’t my normal workspace.

While I might have all the facilities to hand, there is also the nagging feeling that I should be doing something that pays the bills, not messing around with stupid ideas of being the next JK Brown.

The problems is, finding somewhere to decamp with my laptop.

This becomes worse when there are two laptops to consider. Our last two attempts at working in Leamington Spa library have been thwarted by a lack of table space. People might say that libraries are dying off but they are certainly popular with those looking for somewhere to spend time driving a keyboard.

Last week, I had a meeting in Rugby and so decided that I’d try their library for a bit. Despite there being lots of tables, I only just managed to bag the last spot on one with power points. It was OK, but I don’t really feel comfortable on a round table in the middle of a room. After a couple of hours, I felt spent and trundled home.

Where do other people write?

I’ve heard of using cafés but that’s going to be expensive if (like me) you feel you ought to have a drink on the go at all times. I can’t countenance the idea of occupying space for half a day on the basis of a single hot chocolate – even if the coffee shop concerned can’t be bothered to pay it’s tax. That and I’d eat too much cake.

What’s needed is somewhere with people around, but people who can be relied on to mind their own business. Pubs, generally, are too busy. Or at least the chain ones where you might feel justified in drinking very slowly are.

After that, I’m not sure there is anything left. I know I should be able to work anywhere but the words flow better if I feel that I’m in the right spot for writing.

Any suggestions?

2 Comments

Filed under Phil, Writing